Young father prevents adoption of daughter

Children|June 23rd 2015

A young father has succeeded in his bid to prevent the adoption of his infant daughter.

The girl’s parents began their relationship when the father was 18 years old and her mother was only 17. After one pregnancy was terminated, the parents conceived again. This time, they decided against a termination and their daughter, identified in the judgment as ‘L’, was born in early 2014.

However, there were difficulties during the second pregnancy and there were “extensive discussions as to whether or not the mother would keep the baby after the birth”. Shortly after L’s birth, her mother agreed to her being placed into foster care. The local authority applied to have her put up for adoption soon afterwards.

The court issued orders which allowed the local authority to place L up for adoption. Not long after the orders had been made, L was placed with adoptive parents.

The father’s extended family was completely unaware of L’s existence during the care proceedings, so they did not get involved. The father claimed he had not told them because he thought he had “embarrassed and shamed [his] family and let them down again”. During the mother’s first pregnancy, both her family and the father’s had been very upset that the couple “had conceived a child when they were both so young and unprepared to look after a baby”.

However, once his family had been told about L, they immediately contacted social services “to express their wish to care for the child”.

The father applied for permission to oppose the adoption so that L could be placed with her paternal grandfather. This application was supported by the local authority, who said the revelation that the father had family “able and willing to care for [L] throughout her minority is a relevant and sufficient change of circumstances” to consider allowing the opposition.

Sitting at the Royal Courts of Justice in London, Mr Justice Baker said that there were “strong welfare reasons” to allow the father’s appeal so he granted permission for him to do so.

In a post-script to the judgment, Mr Justice Baker noted that following his decision, the couple L was placed with decided not to pursue an adoption so that she could be placed with her family. Shortly afterwards, L moved in with her paternal grandfather.

To read Re LG (A Child) in full, click here.

Photo by Sam Fam via Flickr

Author: Stowe Family Law

Comments(3)

  1. GD says:

    So happy you won the appeal to oppose the adoption we went through the same thing in the UK a few yrs back and we won to take it back to court but I was unsuccessful getting my LG back due to the fact that my LG was settled in her adoptive home and also said I couldn’t put her needs before my own I had lots of support from family and close friends aswell they had no intention of giving her me back good luck for the future with your little girl .

  2. Andy A Thomson says:

    Who makes money from forced adoption ?

    • mark speed says:

      The judge’s, the barristers, the grossly over paid social services selected psychologists (£25,000 for a 30 page report to back up the social workers and destroy the parents) . apparently the council makes very little and used as pawns to just do their job.

      Makes u wonder where all this money comes from! I cases I personally know of ‘children are prepared for advertisement for adoptors to pick and choose!!!

      A lot of adoptors are part of the systems secret, present themselves as carers but really belong to paedophile rings buying the children,
      child trafficking including the selling of organs for transplants,
      snuff movies,
      ritual sactafices the list goes on but u can see the huge amounts of money that just these activities will make for them!!!

      What the hell do we do???? The whole f**king system is involved…sick sick world we living in, absolutely horrific beyond words

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